Ear Health Radio Programs

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This 6-part series explores the anatomy of the ear and how our ears and brain work together to allow us to hear. It then goes on to discuss middle ear infections and what happens if we don’t get them treated. 

Yolŋu Matha with some English

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This 6-part series explores the anatomy of the ear and how our ears and brain work together to allow us to hear. It then goes on to discuss middle ear infections and what happens if we don’t get them treated.

Ear Health - part 1 of 6

In this program Dr Jamie Mapleson and Joy Bulkanhawuy discuss what Yolŋu know about hearing and the meaning of words in Yolŋu Matha related to the ear.

Ear Health - part 2 of 6

This program aims to familiarize people with the anatomy of the middle and inner ear. Bulkanhawuy and Dr Jamie talk about the eardrum, middle ear, auditory ossicles, cochlea, Eustachian tube and eighth nerve that transmits messages from the inner ear to the brain. Bulkanhawuy talks about Yolŋu words that might be appropriate to use for these parts of the ear.

Ear Health - part 3 of 6

This program discusses the way that sound travels through the outer, middle and inner ear and is carried as a message to the brain.

Ear Health - part 4 of 6

Dr Jamie talks about how Balanda doctors began learning this story about how we hear only about 50 years ago. Bulkanhawuy goes on to talk about the symptoms of ear infections, traditional topical medicines that Yolŋu use and what happens when people go to the clinic with an ear infection. Dr Jamie explains the instrument that doctors use to look at the eardrum.

Ear Health - part 5 of 6

This program discusses middle ear infections, bacteria and how they are connected. Bulkanhawuy asks which way bacteria enter the ear.

Ear Health - part 6 of 6

Dr Jamie talks through how bacteria enter through the nose, travel down the Eustachian tube, and reproduce in the middle ear. When the pressure is too much the eardrum bursts resulting in people seeing pus coming out of the ear. The eardrum can become scarred or have permanent holes making it difficult for sound to travel through the parts of the ear and carry the message to the brain. Dr Jamie and Bulkanhawuy discuss how traditional Yolŋu topical medicines work well for outer ear infections while antibiotics are given for middle ear infections to kill bacteria breeding inside the ear.

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